Romantic Dinner Candle Corinthian Order Holder Ancient Greek Column  Gold Tone 3.9″

24.0

Description

Romantic Dinner Candle Corinthian Order Holder Ancient Greek Column  Gold Tone 3.9″

Height : 3.9 ” (10 cm)
Weight : 0.81 lbs (369 gr)

The Corinthian order is named for the Greek city-state of Corinth, to which it was connected in the period. However, according to the architectural historian Vitruvius, the column was created by the sculptor Callimachus, probably an Athenian, who drew acanthus leaves growing around a votive basket. Its earliest use can be traced back to the Late Classical Period (430-323 BC). The earliest Corinthian capital was found in Bassae, dated at 427 BC.

The Corinthian order is the last developed of the three principal classical orders of ancient Greek and Roman architecture. The other two are the Doric order which was the earliest, followed by the Ionic order. When classical architecture was revived during the Renaissance, two more orders were added to the canon, the Tuscan order and the Composite order. The Corinthian, with its offshoot the Composite, is the most ornate of the orders, characterized by slender fluted columns and elaborate capitals decorated with acanthus leaves and scrolls. There are many variations.

The name “Corinthian” is derived from the ancient Greek city of Corinth, although the style had its own model in Roman practice, following precedents set by the Temple of Mars Ultor in the Forum of Augustus (c. 2 AD).[1] It was employed in southern Gaul at the Maison Carrée, Nîmes (illustration, below) and at the comparable podium temple at Vienne. Other prime examples noted by Mark Wilson Jones are the lower order of the Basilica Ulpia and the arch at Ancona (both of the reign of Trajan, 98–117 AD) the “column of Phocas” (re-erected in Late Antiquity but 2nd century in origin), and the “Temple of Bacchus” at Baalbek (c. 150 AD).[2]

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Only logged in customers who have purchased this product may leave a review.