Laocoön And His Sons With Serpents Greek Mythology Trojan Priest Alabaster Statue 11.4 Inches

 76.11

Description

Laocoön And His Sons With Serpents Greek Mythology Trojan Priest Alabaster Statue 11.4 Inches

Height: 11.4 inches (29 cm)
Width: 6.2 inches (15.7 cm)
Depth: 3.5 inches (8.9 cm)
Weight: 3.26 lbs (1480 gr)

Laocoön (/leɪˈɒkoʊˌɒn, -kəˌwɒn/; Ancient Greek: Λαοκόων, romanized: Laokóōn, IPA: [laokóɔːn], gen.: Λαοκόοντος), the son of Acoetes, is a figure in Greek and Roman mythology and the Epic Cycle. He was a Trojan priest who was attacked, with his two sons, by giant serpents sent by the gods. The story of Laocoön has been the subject of numerous artists, both in ancient and in more contemporary times. The most detailed description of Laocoön’s grisly fate was provided by Quintus Smyrnaeus in Posthomerica, a later, literary version of events following the Iliad. According to Quintus, Laocoön begged the Trojans to set fire to the Trojan horse to ensure it was not a trick. Athena, angry with him and the Trojans, shook the ground around Laocoön’s feet and painfully blinded him. The Trojans, watching this unfold, assumed Laocoön was punished for the Trojans’ mutilating and doubting Sinon, the undercover Greek soldier sent to convince the Trojans to let him and the horse inside their city walls. Thus, the Trojans wheeled the great wooden horse in. Laocoön did not give up trying to convince the Trojans to burn the horse, and Athena made him pay even further. She sent two giant sea serpents to strangle and kill him and his two sons. In another version of the story, it was said that Poseidon sent the sea serpents to strangle and kill Laocoön and his two sons.

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